Chinese food

Chicken Soup (Chinese Style)

soup

1 Organic Cornish Game Hen

2-3 Fresh Gold and/or Red Potatoes

2 Tablespoons of Fresh Ginger Root

1 Tablespoon of Goji Berries

1-2 Cups of Fresh Cherry or Grape Tomatoes

1-2 Cups of Shitake Mushrooms

1 Cup of Fresh Celery Chunks

2 Tablespoons of Fresh Red or Yellow Onions

2 Teaspoons of Fresh Chopped Green/Spring Onions

Add all of the above to soup pot or pressure cooker pot (placing chicken first and on the bottom).  Fill soup pot or pressure cooker pot with water until all contents are 1/2 to 3/4 of pot.  Program to cook in pressure cooker for 1 hour.  For stovetop (soup pot), boil on high for 1 hour and then medium to low for 1 hour.  Serves 3 to 4.

 

 

 

Thanksgiving Menu

charliebrownthanksgiving

Hope everyone is geared up for Thanksgiving.  I am just recovering from three weeks of bronchitis and flu (on my last day of antibiotics) and it feels great to be blogging, again.  For those of you who have never tried Breathe Right nose strips, I highly recommend them (you can buy the regular version at any drug and/or grocery store but I’ve only seen the menthol version online).  They might even make great stocking stuffers and/or holiday gifts.

As for Thanksgiving, it will be a quiet one for us (with only a few weeks until the baby arrives).  This year, the menu will be provided by Whole Foods and a local Chinese restaurant:  Peking duck with scallions, Szechuan string beans, chicken corn soup, mashed maple sweet potatoes, mixed fruit platter, and strawberry cream cake.  Short, sweet, simple, and hits the spot.

Eggs with Tomatoes

eggstomatoes
6 or 8 eggs
Half of a small box of grape tomatoes  (cut in halves) or three large vine/beefsteak tomatoes (cut in quarters)
8 stalks of green/spring onions (chopped)
1/2 teaspoon of ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon of minced garlic
Olive oil
Soy sauce
Wok or large frying pan or large sauce pan
 
Coat bottom of wok (or frying pan or sauce pan) with olive oil
Add garlic
Add chopped spring onions
Add cut tomatoes
Turn stove heat on low
Break eggs into mixing bowl
Beat eggs until uniform
Pour egg mix into wok (or frying pan or sauce pan)
Turn heat on high
Stir and flip with spatula to ensure that egg does not get burnt
Add ground pepper
Add soy sauce (per your tastes)
Stir and flip with spatula
Cook eggs until done to your liking
Serve with white rice
 

Holiday Menu

complacency

So, it’s that time of year, again–Passover (and Easter).  Hubby and I are looking to a have a quiet evening and Seder for two on Monday and then are entertaining and hosting the second Seder for 8-10 people next Saturday.  Thank goodness for online ordering and food-to-go.

Everyone knows that we don’t keep kosher.  It’s just never been my belief that the path to salvation is through the food you eat (or don’t eat).  With that said, I am respectful of the high holidays by eating “neutral” foods (i.e., fish, fruit, and veggies, as well as anything else that’s not on the “black list” such as pork and shellfish).  So, this year (which will be my second time hosting Passover Seder [as I have been lucky enough to go to other people’s seders and just sit back and relax in previous years]), I’ve come up with the following menu (with the help of Whole Foods, Lotte, and Charlie Chiang’s):

Ginger matzah ball soup, Chopped chicken liver, Fresh celery (Seder plate), Fresh Parsley (Seder plate), Cut tropical fruit with sliced and blanched almonds,  Coconut macaroons, Chocolate covered matzah, Fresh clementines, Stir-fried spinach with garlic and shitake mushrooms, Hardboiled eggs, (Seder plate), Lettuce (Seder plate), Wasabi (Seder plate), Sashimi platter, and Roasted (Peking) duck

Not traditional (Ashkenazi or Sephardi) Jewish fare, but Chinese American Jewish fare :).  Lets face it–there’s a reason Jews eat lots of Chinese food.  Could it possibly be that (traditional) Jewish food doesn’t quite measure up?

I wanted to write this post today to inspire those who celebrate Passover and Easter (and/or other holidays) to do something different and create your own traditions.  Don’t be afraid to think and step out of the box and be creative and imaginative, and, most of all, be yourself!

Cheap Eats

takeout

The best Chinese food EVER is at Asian BBQ & Noodles.  This place serves the BEST Chinese food I have ever tasted in my entire life.  This hole-in-the-wall restaurant is a gem among locals here in Las Vegas.  People come here for the food.  PERIOD.  If you’re expecting ambiance and great service, this not the place for you.  My favorites are the roast duck, Chinese broccoli, and duck soup.  FYI, restaurant accepts cash only.  Eat your heart out!